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9 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Carleton

Christine is a third-year english student and Kirsten is a fourth-year journalism student.

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9 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Carleton

Christine is a third-year english student and Kirsten is a fourth-year journalism student.

1. Why are we called the Carleton Ravens?

No one actually knows. The first use of “Ravens” was in a 1948 edition of the student newspaper, The Carleton (which is now known as The Charlatan).  It may have arisen from the players’ black uniforms – which, ironically enough, were initially on loan from the Ottawa Trojans and Ottawa Rough Riders, and therefore not originally affiliated with the university.

logo

Information can be found here from Carleton Archives and Research Collections. Original photo can be found here.

2. The original football team, dubbed the “Originals,” was composed of 36 war veterans.

After the end of the Second World War, Carleton opened its doors to war veterans. Thirty-six student veterans composed the first Carleton football team, who played their first game in 1945.

originals

Information and original photo can be found here  from Carleton Archives and Research Collectives. 

3. Rodney the Raven used to have a female counterpart, Ruby.

Not too sure where she’s been in recent years, but here are Rodney & Ruby, happily together at the outdoor amphitheatre in 1985.

ruby

Information and original photo can be found here from Carleton Archives and Research Collections.

4. Ever wondered why the Panda Game is called the Panda Game?

Before the 1952 homecoming football game between Carleton and the University of Ottawa, a University of Ottawa student purchased a stuffed panda and displayed it at a Sparks Street jeweler.  The student had the panda kidnapped prior to the game to attract attention.

At halftime, fans watched as a panda was parachuted from the roof of Lansdowne Stadium.  Thus, Pedro the Panda emerged, and the annual football game was named after Pedro.

panda

Information and original photo can be found here from Carleton Archives and Research Collections.

5. In 1969, Renfrew House became the first co-ed university residence building in North America.

The result? Renfrew House had fewer disciplinary problems than other residences that year, and in the following years, more residence buildings on campus became co-ed.

co-ed

Information and original photo can be found here from Carleton Archives and Research Collections.

6. Frosh week at Carleton has always been full of fun and games.

Frosh Games-Carleton Archives

During “Frosh Field Day,” tug-of-war over the Rideau Canal was a popular activity. The losing team would suffer a cold defeat, being pulled into the water.

Information and original photo can be found here from Carleton Archives and Research Collections.

7. The Latin-America Club was one of the first clubs on campus.

Cuban student-Carleton Archives

In the 1940s and 1950s, students took the reins on campus social engagement. Students paid a $1 fee to the Students’ Council to organize events such as skiing, bowling, prom and the Sadie Hawkins Dance.

Information and original photo can be found here from Carleton Archives and Research Collections.

8. Our university was originally called Carleton College and the original campus was located at the Ottawa Ladies’ College on First Avenue, in the Glebe.

GlebeCampus

Carleton College officially gained university status in May 1957.

Information and original photo can be found here from Carleton Archives and Research Collectives. 

9. Journalism and public administration were the first degrees to be granted by Carleton University, in 1946.

Journalism archive photo

Information can be found on Carleton’s website, here. Original photo can be found here.

 

One response to “9 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Carleton”

  1. Thank you for another fantastic article. Where else could anybody
    get that type of info in such a perfect method of writing?
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