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Thank you for the opportunity: A note on the transferable skills learned outside of the classroom

Brittany Dwyer is a third-year mathematics student.

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Thank you for the opportunity: A note on the transferable skills learned outside of the classroom

Brittany Dwyer is a third-year mathematics student.

What the Peer Helper Program has taught me… 

The thing that I learned most from being a Peer Helper at Career Services is that you are a lot more than your degree. That your future career or careers will not solely be chosen by the title of your diploma but rather through your urging interests and unique skills that you have gathered along the way.  In ten years time, you may be well settled into a job that you think has little or nothing to do with what you studied. But, like I said, school is a lot more than just tests and assignments. Each day, you are gathering transferable skills and insights on your likes and dislikes that will ultimately help create your future.

In some cases, a specific program is absolutely needed for a profession. But most of the time you end up working in a field unrelated to your degree or you may end up in a career that isn’t associated with any degree program at all. More often than not, employers look into your capabilities and personality over what courses you have chosen.

Each program offers a great number of skills, life lessons and techniques that would be extremely difficult to learn on your own — such as written and verbal communication skills, the value of hard work as well as perseverance. Not only that, but a university degree teaches you how to learn, which can be applied anywhere.

From personal experience, few would think that someone studying mathematics would be spending time each week reviewing resumes and giving people career advice. My involvement in this program has given me the chance to expand my abilities and increase my network. The problem-solving strategies that I have gained from my degree have given me the capability to present answers to questions clearly and concisely while also being flexible to new solutions. Applying this to my time at Career Services has been beneficial when working closely with students who are seeking employment.

Ultimately, this unique way of looking at difficult situations has been strongly influenced by my mathematics degree and can be applied to almost anything in life, including my future career.

 

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